Rec-elections (Now more than ever.)  site-specific installation (Abrons Art Center, NY, NY), vinyl decals   3.5' x 47'   2016   Project Description   The weaponization of nostalgia, and the language of myth are tools of manipulation that are deployed every four years within American presidential elections.    Rec-elections is an ongoing project which critically challenges this language by appropriating historical presidential campaign posters and re-inserting them back into the context of presidential elections through site-specific performances, site-specific interventions, lenticular prints, prints, and campaign materials. The project reveals a romanticized American myth that is built on ideas of manifest destiny and which has come to be solidified in our cultural memory.    The site-specific window installation at Abrons Art Center in New York City brings the  Rec-elections  project into the 2016 election by appropriating Richard Nixon’s 1972 campaign poster and erasing his name and image from the campaign poster, leaving behind only his dire campaign slogan “Now more than ever.” The slogan is rescued from history here in an election year where Donald Trump similarly, and eerily, echoed the law & order policies of Nixon’s 1972 campaign to ease the “anxieties” of our time.    Utilizing the language of myth as a material, this  Rec-elections  window installation   acts as a harbinger while revealing a romanticized American myth that is deeply embedded in our cultural memory.

Rec-elections (Now more than ever.)
site-specific installation (Abrons Art Center, NY, NY), vinyl decals
3.5' x 47'
2016

Project Description

The weaponization of nostalgia, and the language of myth are tools of manipulation that are deployed every four years within American presidential elections.

Rec-elections is an ongoing project which critically challenges this language by appropriating historical presidential campaign posters and re-inserting them back into the context of presidential elections through site-specific performances, site-specific interventions, lenticular prints, prints, and campaign materials. The project reveals a romanticized American myth that is built on ideas of manifest destiny and which has come to be solidified in our cultural memory.

The site-specific window installation at Abrons Art Center in New York City brings the Rec-elections project into the 2016 election by appropriating Richard Nixon’s 1972 campaign poster and erasing his name and image from the campaign poster, leaving behind only his dire campaign slogan “Now more than ever.” The slogan is rescued from history here in an election year where Donald Trump similarly, and eerily, echoed the law & order policies of Nixon’s 1972 campaign to ease the “anxieties” of our time.

Utilizing the language of myth as a material, this Rec-elections window installation acts as a harbinger while revealing a romanticized American myth that is deeply embedded in our cultural memory.

 Rec-elections (Let's make America great again, Isabel González)  lenticular print mounted on sintra 24" x 34.077" 2016   Project Description   This iteration of "Rec-elections" appropriates and critically reimagines Ronald Reagan's 1980 campaign poster and lenticular campaign button which featured a black & white portrait of Reagan on a blue background, along with his campaign slogan "Let's make America great again.". Evocatively, Reagan's campaign slogan was famously co-opted, slighty altered and trademarked by Donald Trump into "Make America Great Again" for his 2016 presidential campaign slogan. Historically, conservative political parties have employed language which references the past in their advertising and, Trump's appropriation of Reagan's slogan is the latest example of this weaponized nostalgia.   In this lenticular print, Reagan's image has been erased and replaced with an image of Isabel González, a Puerto Rican activist who in 1902 traveled by boat from Puerto Rico to New York City and was deemed an "alien immigrant" upon her arrival. González challenged the government of the United States in González v. Williams which she would win and eventually pave the way for all Puerto Ricans to receive U. S. citizenship.   Lenticular prints have been utilized throughout political campaign's since the 1940's. Utilizing their unique ability to display two images simultaneously, "Rec-elections (Let's make America great again., Isabel González)" reveals the weaponized nostalgia concealed within elections by illuminating the continued history of anti-immigration rhetoric and nativism that Donald Trump's slogan "Make America Great Again" was designed to conceal. 

Rec-elections (Let's make America great again, Isabel González)
lenticular print mounted on sintra
24" x 34.077"
2016


Project Description

This iteration of "Rec-elections" appropriates and critically reimagines Ronald Reagan's 1980 campaign poster and lenticular campaign button which featured a black & white portrait of Reagan on a blue background, along with his campaign slogan "Let's make America great again.". Evocatively, Reagan's campaign slogan was famously co-opted, slighty altered and trademarked by Donald Trump into "Make America Great Again" for his 2016 presidential campaign slogan. Historically, conservative political parties have employed language which references the past in their advertising and, Trump's appropriation of Reagan's slogan is the latest example of this weaponized nostalgia.
In this lenticular print, Reagan's image has been erased and replaced with an image of Isabel González, a Puerto Rican activist who in 1902 traveled by boat from Puerto Rico to New York City and was deemed an "alien immigrant" upon her arrival. González challenged the government of the United States in González v. Williams which she would win and eventually pave the way for all Puerto Ricans to receive U. S. citizenship.
Lenticular prints have been utilized throughout political campaign's since the 1940's. Utilizing their unique ability to display two images simultaneously, "Rec-elections (Let's make America great again., Isabel González)" reveals the weaponized nostalgia concealed within elections by illuminating the continued history of anti-immigration rhetoric and nativism that Donald Trump's slogan "Make America Great Again" was designed to conceal. 

 Rec-elections (1952-2016)  installation, archival pigment prints mounted on dibond, posters, bumper stickers   Dimensions variable.   2016   Project Description   This second iteration of the Rec-elections project expands the project by erasing the presidential candidates images and names from appropriated campaign posters, leaving behind only their campaign slogans and their campaign office addresses. This erasure of candidates such as Richard Nixon, George Wallace and Mike Huckabee among others reveals the language of myth inherently embedded within American presidential campaign advertising. Utilizing the language of myth as a material, this iteration of Rec-elections takes the form of prints, site-specific installations, campaign buttons, bumper stickers, etc.

Rec-elections (1952-2016)
installation, archival pigment prints mounted on dibond, posters, bumper stickers
Dimensions variable.
2016

Project Description

This second iteration of the Rec-elections project expands the project by erasing the presidential candidates images and names from appropriated campaign posters, leaving behind only their campaign slogans and their campaign office addresses. This erasure of candidates such as Richard Nixon, George Wallace and Mike Huckabee among others reveals the language of myth inherently embedded within American presidential campaign advertising. Utilizing the language of myth as a material, this iteration of Rec-elections takes the form of prints, site-specific installations, campaign buttons, bumper stickers, etc.

 Rec-elections (Now more than ever.)  archival pigment print mounted on dibond 24" x 54" 2014

Rec-elections (Now more than ever.)
archival pigment print mounted on dibond
24" x 54"
2014

 Rec-elections (We've been misled too often. Demand truth.)  archival pigment print mounted on dibond 13.5" x 22" 2014

Rec-elections (We've been misled too often. Demand truth.)
archival pigment print mounted on dibond
13.5" x 22"
2014

 Rec-elections (A breath of fresh air.)  archival pigment printmounted on dibond 21" x 28" 2014

Rec-elections (A breath of fresh air.)
archival pigment printmounted on dibond
21" x 28"
2014

 Rec-elections (Give the Presidency back to the people.)  site-specific intervention (Washington D.C.), protest posters, photographic documentation 2017

Rec-elections (Give the Presidency back to the people.)
site-specific intervention (Washington D.C.), protest posters, photographic documentation
2017

 Rec-elections (Give the Presidency back to the people.)  free downloadable poster 17" x 22" 2017   Project Description   A free downloadable poster from the "Rec-elections" project to be printed out and used in protest.     Download poster here.

Rec-elections (Give the Presidency back to the people.)
free downloadable poster
17" x 22"
2017


Project Description

A free downloadable poster from the "Rec-elections" project to be printed out and used in protest.

Download poster here.

 Rec-elections (Romney Great for 68', RNC#1)  site-specific performance (Tampa, FL), protest signs, silk screened   t-shirts, photographic documentation   Dimensions variable.   2012-ongoing   Project Description   The first iteration of Rec-elections began as a campaign of site-specific performances and interventions which took place during the 2012 presidential election in New York City and the Republican National Convention in Tampa, FL. Appropriated historical presidential campaign posters like the Romney 68’ poster were re-inserted back into the context of the 2012 Presidential election through television interviews, press photos which circulated online, and performances in protest marches and rallies at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, FL.    

Rec-elections (Romney Great for 68', RNC#1)
site-specific performance (Tampa, FL), protest signs, silk screened
t-shirts, photographic documentation
Dimensions variable.
2012-ongoing

Project Description

The first iteration of Rec-elections began as a campaign of site-specific performances and interventions which took place during the 2012 presidential election in New York City and the Republican National Convention in Tampa, FL.
Appropriated historical presidential campaign posters like the Romney 68’ poster were re-inserted back into the context of the 2012 Presidential election through television interviews, press photos which circulated online, and performances in protest marches and rallies at the Republican National Convention in Tampa, FL.

 

 Rec-elections (Romney Great for 68', RNC#2)  site-specific performance (Tampa, FL), protest signs, silk screened   t-shirts, photographic documentation   Dimensions variable.   2012-ongoing

Rec-elections (Romney Great for 68', RNC#2)
site-specific performance (Tampa, FL), protest signs, silk screened
t-shirts, photographic documentation
Dimensions variable.
2012-ongoing

 Rec-elections (Romney Great for 68', RNC) (Los Angeles Times website screenshot)  site-specific performance (Tampa, FL), protest signs, silk screened t-shirts, photographic documentation 2012-ongoing       

Rec-elections (Romney Great for 68', RNC) (Los Angeles Times website screenshot)
site-specific performance (Tampa, FL), protest signs, silk screened
t-shirts, photographic documentation
2012-ongoing